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The Select Auction of Canadian Art & Decorative Arts


What’s New: Our Select Auction of Canadian Art & Decorative Arts

Last year’s ‘Canada 150 Auction’ was not just a great theme – it demonstrated how successful the concept of a Canadian Content sale could be. With our diverse expertise, it seemed obvious to create a platform to offer items with a Canadian pedigree drawing from our Canadian Art and Decorative Arts departments. This new auction category: The Select Auction of Canadian Art & Decorative Arts launches this weekend.

We asked the coordinators of the auction, Hayley Dawson (Decorative Arts) and Rochelle Konn (Canadian Art) to describe their experience working together to assemble the sale and some of their personal favourite pieces.

Hayley:

As the first time working closely with another department to organize a sale, I was pleasantly surprised by the cohesiveness of the final product. I think it highlights the common thread in Canadian art and culture; you can see the markers of a young nation trying to succeed and a love for nature and folk culture that intertwine throughout the sale.

We’ve included a lot of fantastic Canadian silver, particularly from Quebec. I never thought I could be so impressed by a simple piece of silver as I am by the Laurent Amiot snuff box (Lot 3). If you look very closely, you can see in the photo that the cover is attached by a “flush-hinge” that is designed and crafted seamlessly into the engraved details on the front. You can tell when you handle it that it was constructed to last for generations. 

The collection of Karin Pavey pottery (lots 210-216), particularly the teapots, are a natural favourite of mine. With their wild colours and surreal forms they look like they are straight out of the Mad Hatter’s tea party. Karin Pavey is currently a pottery instructor at Toronto’s Gardiner Museum and I have been trying (without success to date) to join one of her drop-in classes for a while now. Rochelle and I enjoyed pairing these colourful decorative pieces alongside paintings with similar bright palettes like Cécil Emond's and Mary Pavey's. 

Lastly (although I could name more favourites), there is a fascinating group of photographs and other artefacts from William Lyon Mackenzie King. I can’t imagine (but hope) it would be possible to come across such an intimate and historically significant collection as this for sale again in the future. 

Rochelle:

You’ve put me on the spot - there are so many interesting things to choose from. With regard to the art, there's a great little René Richard gouache that I love, lot 19, Forest Interior and a lovely Pegi Nicol painting Rockcliffe in First Spring, lot 16, that I would love to own.

A lot of the art is folky, colourful and whimsical works that are just really joyful. The two Conrad Furey paintings of rowers (lots 190 and 196) make me eager to get up north to go canoeing, and lot 136, the Cécile Emond painting, has me dreaming of picnics in High Park this summer. There are also two beautiful carved paddles by Northwest Coast artist Bill Henderson (166 and 167) that are stunning.

Moving away from the ‘flat art’ – I am really drawn to the Brooklyn Pottery lots, specifically lot 180, the "O'Canada" jug. Lot 2, the Conquest of Canada medal is amazing, a really important relic of Canadian history that I just want to hold in my hand. And of course, the Michael Fortune "Bee's Wing" living room table (lot 241).

It's been fun working with the Decorative Arts department; and a great, totally new experience working with such different items that are not usually together in one sale. It was an interesting challenge to figure out how to present them together for the purposes of creating a cohesive online gallery and catalogue; and how to ensure we were presenting everything in the best, complementary manner.

We first tried to order them all chronologically, but that ended up not working very well as most of the art was from the mid to late 20th century, and the decorative/historic lots date back to the 18th century. So we decided to just incorporate the paintings based on their aesthetic qualities, into the chronological order of the decorative/historic pieces. 

The next step we’re excited about is setting up the preview – and we hope everyone has the chance to come see what we’ve done!

To find out more from Rochelle and Hayley, you can contact them at:

rk@waddingtons.ca

hd@waddingtons.ca

To view the Gallery click here

Posted: 6/13/2018 12:00:00 AM
By: Tess McLean


Canadian Art Spring Season 2018


Lot 31
Sorel Etrog
War Remembrance

Linda Rodeck Introduces our Spring 2018 Canadian Art Season.

For centuries, trading merchandise from far and wide has proven lucrative to industrious merchants, particularly those who specialized in luxurious or rare goods. But throughout history such trade has also generated significant intellectual, spiritual and philosophical dividends.
 
I can't help thinking about the great Spice Routes and Silk Roads when I think of auction season. Each spring and fall, an auction house will assemble thousands of precious items, brought from all over the world and from all time periods. It wasn't so long ago, for example, that Waddington's sold a woolly mammoth tusk! These items exhibit a rare beauty which is often the primary reason they are desired but there are also magnificent stories that attach themselves to objects.  
 
Waddington's Spring 2018 Canadian art sale, which is comprised of 160 lots, represents 160 amazing creation stories, biographies or histories about each lot's maker, their subject, their execution, their owners both prior and current, and their significance in the past, present and future. Each sale is a fascinating installment in the story of Canadian art-making and collecting.
 
Join us on a journey of discovery this season by reading some of the stories you will find in our Canadian Art auction catalogue or stop by our previews to hear some of the wonderful anecdotes our specialists can provide in person. 
 

To view the Auction Gallery and PDF Catalogue: click here

Auction: Monday, May 28 at 7:00 p.m.

On View:

Friday, May 25 from 12:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Saturday, May 26 from 11:00 am to 5:00 pm

Sunday, May 27 from 11:00 am to 5:00 pm

Monday, May 28 from 10:00 am to 12:00 pm

Or by appointment.

Preview and auction take place at Waddington's.

To find out more: canadianart@waddingtons.ca

Posted: 5/1/2018 12:00:00 AM
By: Linda Rodeck


News from Concrete Contemporary Art & Projects


As we turn the corner into our Spring 2018 auction season, we have some exciting news to share about Concrete Contemporary Auctions and Projects in our ongoing effort to create more opportunities for Canadian contemporary works.

This season we are presenting our Concrete Contemporary auctions in conjunction with the Canadian, Inuit, and Indigenous Art departments at Waddington’s. That means that rather than hold stand-alone auctions of Canadian contemporary art, all works consigned to us for sale will either be offered in our new, bi-monthly Canadian Art Select online auctions or will be placed into our bi-annual Canadian Fine Art live auctions. These cross-departmental auctions will greatly increase the exposure of Canadian contemporary art to other areas of the market.

Our Canadian Fine Art auction on May 28 will include major works by Carol Wainio, Michael Adamson and a rare work by Mike Bayne as part of the contemporary component of the auction.

The Canadian Art Select online auction in April will also feature a number of impressive contemporary works. Consignments to both auctions are still open with an end of March deadline for the Canadian Fine Art auction and consignments to the Canadian Select auction open on an ongoing basis. The consignment process will continue to be a seamless experience with property curated by Stephen Ranger and Kristin Vance.

Over the past five years we have set auction records and created secondary markets for dozens of important contemporary artists -- our new format promises to expand on this mandate. And we will continue to focus on Canadian Contemporary Art with a renewed focus on exhibitions, events and ongoing special projects.

Please contact Kristin Vance at kv@waddingtons.ca to discuss sale dates and deadlines.

As always, we look forward to seeing you in our galleries.

 

Valerie Palmer Lighthouse Price Realised: $43,200
 
 
Tim Zuck Two Shapes Price Realised: $7,800
Posted: 3/10/2018 12:00:00 AM
By: Stephen Ranger


"Fantastic Martin Brothers Birds Soar"


Published in Antiques and the Arts Weekly

by Madelia Hickman Ring

TORONTO, CANADA – On December 6, Waddington’s offered an extraordinary private collection of nearly 100 pieces of sculptural stoneware objects and pots by Martin Brothers Studio potters, including, most notably, a small flock of Robert Wallace Martin’s “Wally Birds.”

The sale realized $502,309 CDN and all 92 lots offered were sold, achieving the rare distinction of “white-glove” status. With very few collections of this size available on the market, Waddington’s was not certain what the outcome would be, and the sale exceeded the expectations of Bill Kime, Waddington’s senior specialist in ceramics, glass and silver and one of its senior auctioneers.

The success of the sale underscores not only the strength of market for this specific collecting category but also Waddington’s sale strategy of selling with conservative estimates and without reserves. Kime said there had been extraordinary interest in the sale from private collectors, dealers and institutions but that more than half of the pieces were purchased by private collectors.

While there was international interest, most buyers were from the United Kingdom, United States and Canada. Kime said he was surprised at the amount of interest from Canadian buyers and was pleased that several pieces, including a few of the “Wally Birds,” were purchased by Canadian buyers.

The sale got off to a promising start with the first lot, a face jug selling for $9,000, six times its low estimate. The top-selling lot was a stoneware bird tobacco jar, by Robert Wallace Martin, dated 1907, approximately 8 inches tall. Estimated at $15/20,000, it more than tripled its low estimate when it sold for $48,000. Kime thinks it could have set a record price for a late Martinware bird due to its distinctive and unusual glazed decoration. According to Kime, Martin would go to London’s Old Bailey courthouse and sketch the birds there, giving them exaggerated features, and they would become the “Wally Birds” so alluring to collectors today. Many later birds were made as forms with movable heads; this ability to further animate the birds adds to their appeal. Regardless of size, “Wally Birds” did well: two 4-inch small birds each doubled their low estimates, while a 2-inch miniature bird brought three times its low estimate.

Working in late Victorian-era London, the Martin Brothers are considered to have been pioneers in transforming decorative arts from the formalism of the Victorian era to a more whimsical and naturalistic style that foreshadowed studio pottery of the Art Nouveau movement. Kime attributes the appeal of Martinware to their whimsical and eccentric aesthetic that, while they led the way for other Studio potters, was purely their own.

Eclectic to the core, the Martin Brothers’ work bears the influence of art and architecture from the Middle Ages and Gothic periods, but much of their unique pottery exists in a category of its own. While holding on to the eclectic characteristics of Victorian times, many of their sculptures took on exaggerated forms and personalities. Among recognizable Martinware forms are their sculpted face jugs, Gothic stoneware vases and spoon warmers resembling monsters, mythical creatures, classical figures and the use of sea life motifs and other fantasy-inspired figures. A fantastical beast-form spoon warmer jug more than tripled its low estimate when it sold for $19,200 and other forms outperformed their estimates as well.

Kime said that the collection was relatively unknown, belonging to a couple in the Vancouver Islands who began by collecting Moorcroft pottery. The couple were advised by scholar and dealer Richard Dennis and traveled to London in 1978. Staying in an apartment over his studio, the wife of the couple discovered the collection of Martinware he was assembling. The couple would continue to seek guidance from Dennis, as well as Vancouver gallery owners Neil MacMillan and Dan Perrin, who are recognized as “market makers” for Martinware. According to Kime, the collection had no obvious gaps and was extremely balanced, including works by not just the four Martin brothers but also the various workmen who were known to have worked in their studio. He concluded his comments by saying the sale was “the most fun he’d ever had in 40 years.”

All prices reported buyer’s premium.

Published: December 19, 2017

Posted: 1/30/2018 12:00:00 AM
By: Tess McLean


Staff Favourites in Our Decorative Arts Auction


CESARE LAPINI (ITALIAN, 1848-AFTER 1902) PSYCHE AND THE BUTTERFLY

Ellie Muir, our Appraisals and Consignments Manager, talks about two of her favourite lots in our Decorative Arts auction. Both sculptures were gifted to the Art Gallery of Ontario and are being deaccessioned to benefit future art purchases at the AGO. Meet "Psyche and the Butterfly" and "Dance of The Three Graces".

"PSYCHE AND THE BUTTERFLY"

This version of Psyche shows her in a jubilant state, celebrating her new immortality and reunion with her husband, Cupid. She has accomplished momentous tasks assigned to her by Venus in order to achieve her union of love, and seems to be joyfully sending a butterfly, which symbolizes innocence as well as transformation, into flight. Everything about her is ascending up into the air, her hair, her arms, even the vines of roses encircling her body reach upward. Psyche now has her own butterfly wings as she has joined Cupid as an immortal.

Cesare Lapini made many sculptures of Psyche at various points in her journey - this one in particular shows her in her final state; self-assured and confident in her new place amongst the Gods.

Lot 241 - CESARE LAPINI (ITALIAN, 1848-AFTER 1902) PSYCHE AND THE BUTTERFLY Carrara marble, inscribed Gall.Lapini, Firenze, 1895, height 57.25 in — 145.4 cm Provenance: Gifted to the Art Gallery of Ontario by Mrs. J. Morrow Deaccessioned to benefit art purchases at the AGO.

Estimate: $20,000—30,000 

"DANCE OF THE THREE GRACES"

Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux is best known for his sensational marble sculpture “Dance” which adorns the façade of the Paris Opéra (a replacement is now there displayed as the original was moved to the Louvre in 1964 to preserve it from the elements).

When it was unveiled in 1868 it caused a sensation as it went against the popular Neo-Classical aesthetic of the time and instead favoured a raucous Baroque style where the figures seemed to move with joyous sensuality and abandon. Some unhappy onlookers were compelled to deface it by throwing bottles of ink. As is often the case, any publicity is good publicity, especially when it comes to art, and Carpeaux went on to produce many other iterations of “Dance”.

This lot shows three of those figures in a smaller configuration, but they are no less pleasurable to view. The swirling motion of the women with their fingers just barely touching give the sense that the centrifugal force of their dance could send them flinging outward at any moment as they emit peals laughter. Carpeaux produced plaster, terra cotta and bronze versions at his atelier right up until his death in 1875.

Lot 239 - JEAN-BAPTISTE CARPEAUX (FRENCH, 1827-1875) DANCE OF THE THREE GRACES, 1874 terracotta, incised signature and date, and with impressed ‘Atelier-Dépôt, Paris’, and ‘Propriété Carpeaux’ seals, height 31.5 in — 80 cm Provenance: Gifted to the Art Gallery of Ontario by the Junior Women’s Fund, 1958, inventory no. 57/27 Deaccessioned to benefit art purchases at the AGO.

Estimate: $8,000—12,000

JEAN-BAPTISTE CARPEAUX (FRENCH, 1827-1875) DANCE OF THE THREE GRACES, 1874

To view the online catalogue: Decorative Arts

Posted: 12/5/2017 12:00:00 AM
By: Ellie Muir


The Martin Brothers – A Private Collection


Martin Brothers Stoneware Bird Tobacco Jar, R.W. Martin & Bros., 1914 Est. $15,000 - 20,000

Comprised of nearly 100 pieces, this auction includes an intriguing mixture of sculptural objects and pots, most notably a small flock of Robert Wallace Martin’s ‘Wally birds’.

Working in late Victorian-era London, the Martin Brothers are considered to have been pioneers in transforming decorative arts from the stale formalism of the Victorian era to a more whimsical and naturalistic style that foreshadowed the Art Nouveau movement.

While holding appeal to the eclecticism characteristic of Victorian times, many of their sculptures took on disturbing and bewildering forms and personalities. The most celebrated examples can be found among Robert Wallace Martin’s grotesque bird sculptures, which may function as tobacco jars or vases, but are highly stylised to resemble the sometimes deviant human subjects after whom they were modelled. 

Eclectic to the core, the Martin Brothers' work bears the influence of art and architecture from the Middle Ages and Gothic periods, but much of their unique pottery exists in a category of its own. Among recognizable Martinwares, their sculpted ‘face jugs’, gothic stoneware vases and spoon warmers resembling monsters, portrayals of mythical creatures and classical figures, and the use of sea life motifs and other fantasy-imbued images are all very well represented in this collection. View the catalogue.

Please be sure to meet all the characters in this extraordinary collection at our preview opening at 12:00 noon on Friday, December 1, at Waddington's in Toronto.

Bill Kime Senior Specialist

 

Posted: 11/29/2017 12:00:00 AM
By: Bill Kime


100-POINT FEVER


Most of us wine lovers have at one point experienced the nirvana that comes with the perfect glass of wine. Often, that perfect wine does not exist in isolation, but is accompanied by: the perfect date, a perfect meal, the perfect setting, or any number of other lovely things that are all part of the experience. Will any great wine taste better when it is shared with people you love and an inspired setting?

Well, there are some who would disagree and suggest that a perfect wine is simply a combination of a great region, exacting producer, ideal terroir and great vintage.

We are not here to argue either way, suffice to say that no less than 80 wines in our current auction are rated 100 points by Robert Parker’s Wine Advocate. A further 88 are rated between 97-99 points. From the classic 1989 Château Haut-Brion and 1986 Château Mouton Rothschild to newer vintages like the 2009 Château Leoville-Poyferre and the 2010 Château Petrus, perfection reigns supreme. Let’s not forget our friends in California like the 2001 and 2007 Harlan Estate, or the 2002 and 2007 Shafer Hillside Select Cabernet Sauvignon. The legendary Penfolds Grange from 1998 and 2001 couldn’t have scored higher either -- unless someone has invented the 200-point scale!

We encourage you to really dig deep into this auction; we know you’ll be greatly rewarded whether you are looking for mixed lots of well-cellared wine for the holidays, or if you are intent on filling your cellar with the best of the best. We’ve got it all.

As we do prior to the end of every auction, we’ll send out a list of some wines that still represent great opportunities. If you aren’t already on our fine wine email list, please visit Fine Wine Emails to subscribe. In the meantime, feel free to contact Joann, Devin or myself with any questions you may have.

Enjoy the auction.

Stephen Ranger, Senior Specialist

Posted: 11/28/2017 12:00:00 AM
By: Stephen Ranger


Concrete Contemporary Art Auction


Lot 50 - KIM DORLAND Bush Party #6

The Fall 2017 Concrete Contemporary Art auction is perhaps the most diverse offering we have yet to put forward. Iconic abstractions by David Bolduc and Michael Adamson are offered side-by-side with a figurative Kim Dorland painting, while illustrative works by Marcel Dzama and Gary Taxali compliment the photo-based works of Barbara Astman and the Sanchez Brothers.

Two haunting landscapes by Wanda Koop are contrasted by a print featuring Alex McLeod’s futuristic, made-up world and mythical paintings by Stephen Appleby-Barr. Canada’s regions are all well represented; the range of works highlighting the diverse and abundant creativity of this country.

Once again we have partnered with Artsy.net for this live auction, inviting bidders from all over the world as we work to expand our market for Canadian contemporary art.

We look forward to seeing you in the gallery this season and thank you for your support of Canadian Contemporary Art.

Stephen Ranger, Senior Specialist

Auction:

Monday, November 27 at 7:00 p.m.

 

 

Posted: 11/27/2017 12:00:00 AM
By: Stephen Ranger


FALL INUIT ART AUCTION ROUNDUP


This past Tuesday, 139 works of Inuit and Northwest Coast artwork were presented for auction at Waddington’s, the premier auction house for Inuit art and now in our 39th year of conducting Inuit art auctions. The energy from a week of exhibition culminated in our busiest preview ever and carried directly over into spirited bidding during the sale.

Highlights of the auction include:

  • Over 90% of works sold, well above industry standard, resulted in elated consigners and buyers alike.
  • Feverish bidding led to prices repeatedly exceeding the healthy pre-auction estimates for early stonecuts and stencils. Three iconic Niviaxie stencils were each hammered down above the $10,000 mark.
  • Sculptural form took precedence for collectors, with the elegant and understated 20” caribou by Osuitok Ipeelee selling for nearly $30,000.
  • Impressive prices were also commanded from our curated selection of small-scale sculptures, such as Judas Ullulaq’s wonderful 6” work in antler, which sold for almost three times its estimate at $2,840.
  • Contemporary works from artists such as Bill Nasogaluak and Suvinai Ashoona sold well and within or above estimate.
  • The strong interest displayed for the Northwest Coast works during the previews resulted in 11 pieces selling for over a combined $30,000.

This year, we made some long overdue changes to how we present Inuit artwork in our catalogues. The Inuit community names are now included. Artists’ names are now also displayed in Inuktitut syllabics. Furthermore, Inuit artists' disc numbers – rooted as they are in the colonial system – have been removed from the catalogue descriptions, and now only appear in the index for reference.

It was particularly nice to see some familiar faces reappear during the auction and previews this season, as well as to connect with some new collectors. The interest in the artform is truly in a transition period between long-standing collectors - to those newer to it, and the interaction between these collector profiles is exciting to see and is reflected in the results of the sale. For further information about this auction or consigning with us in the future, please contact me directly. Thank you to all of our consignors and buyers for a wonderful evening.

Christa Ouimet
Senior Specialist

 

Lot 51 JOHNNY INUKPUK WOMAN CLEANING A FISH REALISED: $21,600

 

Lot 60 NIVIAXIE HUNTER WITH BEAR                                REALISED: $13,200

 

Lot 63 OSUITOK IPEELEE CARIBOU ON HIND LEGS REALISED: $28,800

 

Posted: 11/23/2017 12:00:00 AM
By: Christa Ouimet


Having our colours done - for the fall season


I may be the only person old enough in the Canadian and Inuit Art departments to remember the craze of “having your colours done”. Trained colour consultants would be engaged to find colours for their clients to wear that best complemented their complexion, eyes, and hair colour, thereby enhancing one’s attractiveness and boosting one’s confidence. People were categorized as Seasons. Cool colour palettes were “Winters”, warm muted colours were “Falls”. You get the idea.

We know colour can have a powerful effect on us. Whether dramatic, sophisticated, soothing or subtle, colour impacts our mood and carries varied - even contradictory- cultural meaning. Our reaction to colour serves both a biological purpose, and an aesthetic ambition. 

Each season, one of our favourite projects leading up to the auction preview, which begins tomorrow (dates and times below), is determining the set up of our preview gallery in order to best enhance the works of art being offered that season. This involves decisions about layout, placement of lots, lighting and choice of wall colour. While I suspect I can be somewhat dictatorial about some of these decisions, the fact is they are largely predetermined by the sale itself. Once we reach our consignment deadline and begin laying out our catalogue, it becomes very apparent that we have a “blue” sale or a “coral” sale or a “violet” sale. Inevitably, one colour or two seems to dominate, and the rest falls into place accordingly.

This year, several key paintings inspired our choice of wall colour and we have developed spaces that contain families of paintings and sculpture which play off one another. They have been set in environments that have been prepared to enhance your ability to read them and enjoy them.

While Russell Foster, a neuroscientist at Oxford, maintains “The whole point of colour vision is not to inspire poets, but to allow contrast detection,” (Tom Chivers, February 2015, The Telegraph), I can’t help but take a slightly less scientific position. And while I can’t argue with an Oxford intellect, I hope the layout and design of our saleroom both pleases and inspires you. Please join us this season for a dose of chromotherapy.

(Oh, and in case you were wondering, I’m a “Summer”).

Linda G. Rodeck, Senior Specialist

 

 

 

 

Canadian Fine Art Auction
Monday, November 20 at 7:00 pm

On View:

Thursday, November 16 from 12:00 pm to 7:00 pm
Friday, November 17 from 12:00 pm to 7:00 pm
Saturday, November 18 from 11:00 am to 5:00 pm
Sunday, November 19 from 11:00 am to 5:00 pm
Monday November 20 from 10:00 am to 12:00 pm

View the Auction Gallery

Posted: 11/15/2017 12:00:00 AM
By: Linda Rodeck


November's Rich Offerings


Lot 54 RANDOLPH STANLEY HEWTON, SAINT-JOSEPH DE LÉVIS (detail)

While we’ve never had lunch together, exchanged greeting cards or, in truth, even met, my “good friend” Heather Reisman rarely lets me down.

When I am wandering around Indigo not quite finding the right read for the weekend, time and again I have relied on one of “Heather’s Picks”. Last week, it was Sapiens: A brief history of humankind by Yuval Noah Harari. It wasn’t long before I found myself identifying with our earliest ancestors.

Harari writes that for nearly our entire history Sapiens have lived as foragers and that even today “our brains and minds are adapted to a life of hunting and gathering.” I can tell you that there is a lot of hunting and gathering that goes in to putting together an auction and like the early Sapiens I, too, “roam from place to place in search of food”, with which to stock the auction catalogue larder; I, too, am “influenced by the changing seasons” and “explore new lands opportunistically” looking for areas that are rich in what will sustain us.

The life of a forager was varied, interesting, and rewarding we are told, and I can attest that the life of a modern art forager (that’s forager not forger) can also be very rewarding. “The forager's secret of success” says Harari “was their varied diet”.

Likewise, in this season’s sale you will find a “varied diet” of works of art that span hundreds of years of Canadian painting, that come from or were painted by artists from all over our enormous nation (my primary hunting ground) and which reflect, stylistically and attitudinally, myriad positions, schools and periods of Canadian Art making.

We hope you will take the time to work your way through the rich offerings of this season, stopping here and there to sample some of the fine works we have harvested for your enjoyment.

Click here for auction details

 

Posted: 11/7/2017 12:00:00 AM
By: Linda Rodeck


Hey Our Vancouver Friends!


Emily Carr, Forest Clearing. Realised: $472,000

Considering selling a work of art? Need advice on estate planning or downsizing as it relates to understanding the value of an item or collection? We can help you find out what it's all really worth and what your options are.

Stephen Ranger, Vice President Waddington's, is joining me this week in Vancouver to talk about selling, buying or appraising art - and much more.

We've been invited to talk with a few groups already, but we're reserving the evening of Thursday, October 19 specifically for individual appointments. And as experts in the broadest range of art and objets d'art, this is a great opportunity for you to find out about more about your Asian, Canadian, International or Inuit Art; Decorative Arts; Fine Jewellery or Fine Wine.

Date & Time: Thursday, October 19, 6:00 - 9:00 pm Location: Sutton Place Hotel, 845 Burrard Street, Vancouver

To make an appointment to discuss selling, buying or appraising your valued possessions with Stephen, please contact me: Jacqui Dixon, Director of Client Services, Western Canada jd@waddingtons.ca or 1.778.837.4588.

Just a reminder that I'm Vancouver-based and available at any time to provide guidance - so don't hesitate to get in touch with me.

And for the rest of the world... our appraisal specialists are always happy to provide their expertise, no matter where you are. Find out more from our Appraisals Manager Ellie Muir at appraisals@waddingtons.ca or call 416.504.9100 / toll-free 1.877.504.5700.

 

 

Posted: 10/13/2017 12:00:00 AM
By: Jacqui Dixon


Bright, Bold and Exceptional Quality Prints Attracts Bidders


Ellsworth Kelly, Blue/Green (EK70-336) sold for $17,500

Our September 2017 Prints and Photography Online Auction Results

Responding to market trends for bright, bold and exceptional quality of minimalist prints, the highlight of our auction was Ellsworth Kelly’s Blue/Green (EK70-336) achieving a top five price for the artist’s prints this year. Selling for over three times the high estimate for $17,500, Blue/Green (EK70-336) caught the attention of many bidders. Reflecting the transition between Kelly’s postwar abstraction towards a minimalistic point of view, this work is a poignant and important time the artist’s career. Blue/Green is also a perfect example of the exactitude of the lithographic process, the crisp delineation between the ink and white spaces.

What Attracts Collectors to Prints?

Printmaking techniques are also important factors to consider when collecting and buyers were equally drawn to Kelly’s perfectionism. Another highlight from the auction was Josef Albers who’s I-S’K (from Homage to the Square) sold for $10,625. The instant recognisability of the artist’s style has grown in popularity by collectors. Not only precise, but the colours that each square dons, has strong links to the colour field movement, while also expressing minimalistic tendencies.

This print was a rarity on the market as the colour combination selected by Albers was unique, combining deep, rich colours contrasting with an apple green centre square, which was undeniably attractive to buyers.

There is clearly excitement around the Bauhaus movement and its artists within the art community from exhibitions to collecting taste, ranging from printmaking to architecture. This modern movement will be gaining strength and one to watch on the auction block for seasons to come.

What's Popular in Photography?

Black and white photography continues to dominate the market as buyers look to build their collection with notable, groundbreaking photographers of generations gone by.

Works by André Kertész performed exceptionally well with a perfect sell-through rate, totalling over $16,500. Not only in pristine condition, these works were particularly strong due to their direct provenance from Kertész himself, by way of a private collection near Toronto.

Why Buy Prints & Photography?

Prints and Photography are an affordable way to build your art collection, while also providing access to the very best artists. Waddington’s Prints and Photography department’s expertise draws top works by consignors globally, while also attracting bidders from around the world, remaining competitive with other international auction houses.

To find out more about our auctions and how to consign, please contact Holly Mazar-Fox, hmf@waddingtons.ca

 

Posted: 10/2/2017 12:00:00 AM
By: Holly Mazar-Fox


Ethnographic Arts & Artifacts Auction Highlight: A Yoruba Ogboni Drum


Lot 36 - YORUBA OGBONI DRUM BY AREOGUN (1880-1956), OSI ILORIN, NIGERIA

This rare Ogboni drum carving by Areogun (c.1880-1954) of Osi Ilorin, Northern Ekiti, Nigeria, is featured in our Ethnographic Arts & Artifacts Auction.

With a pre-sale estimate of $8,000—12,000, the carved wood drum, with natural pigments, hide and fibre, stands 64.8 cm, with a diameter of 53.3 cm.

Note: The Ogboni drum was used throughout Yoruba (southwestern and north-central Nigeria) in most cultural events, and their collective symbolism helps tie together elements of Yoruba society. In fact, without the music of the Ogboni drums, most funerals, festivals, and ceremonies would have been incomplete or impossible.

These drums, known as the ritual drums of Nigeria, have remained primarily remote and covert.

The Yoruba is one of the three largest ethnic groups of Nigeria concentrated in the southwestern part of the country.

Provenance:
Sherwin Memel, Los Angeles; Lot 102,
Sotheby’s, New York, May, 16, 2008;
Collection of Joey and Toby Tanenbaum, Toronto

Ethnographic Art and Artifacts Online Auction
September 30 - October 5

Register now to bid online: http://onlineauctions.waddingtons.ca

On View:
Sunday, October 1, 12:00 pm to 4:00 pm
Monday, October 2, 1:00 pm to 7:00 pm

To find out more please contact Andrew Brandt at 416.847.6168 / ab@waddingtons.ca 

Posted: 9/26/2017 12:00:00 AM
By: Andrew Brandt


Embracing Simplicity, Style and Workmanship


What do Eames and Miller have in common with Jensen, Hansen and Anderson?

Let’s start with they're all part of a resurgence of love for design inspired by the mid-century modern era in home furnishings, décor, art and architecture. A love for stylish, yet functional, clean-lined designs, exemplified by furniture designers Charles and Ray Eames and Herman Miller.

It’s not hard to see why people are in love with this style once again. The scale and simplicity is perfect for anyone streamlining their life; whether you’re in pursuit of a more Zen-like environment or responding to the practicality of what works best in the structure of condo living.

And with the same style aesthetic, creations by the jewellery designers of that period are equally relevant and appealing today, with their focus on simplicity, style and workmanship.

The philosophy of designers Georg Jensen, Hans Hansen and David Anderson and others was to create designs of both functionality and beauty - craftsmanship at the forefront.

Our upcoming Silver & Costume Jewellery auction features several excellent examples by Jensen, Hansen and Anderson, as well as by lesser-known designers, whose designs are equally compelling.

If you are a lover of anything mid-century modern, make sure to you take a look at the many amazing offerings in our September 30 – October 5 online auction.

Here are a few lots that might appeal to your sense of style:

Lot 22 ERLING CHRISTOPHERSEN NORWEGIAN STERLING SILVER PENDANT set with a granite specimen, and suspended on a silver chain
Estimate: $100—150
 
Together with:
 
Lot 36 MARICELA (ISIDRO GARCIA PIÑA) MEXICAN STERLING SILVER FRINGE NECKLACE, set with 7 amethyst cabochons
Estimate: $120—160
 
Lot 24 GEORG JENSEN DANISH STERLING SILVER BRACELET, CIRCA 1960’s. Designer: Steffen Andersen, design #210
Estimate: $200—300
 
Together with:
 
Lot 63 NIELS ERIK FROM DANISH STERLING SILVER CIRCULAR BROOCH, set with an amber cabochon
Estimate: $60—80
 
Lot 65 PAIR OF TONE VIGELAND NORWEGIAN STERLING SILVER EAR SLINGS, CIRCA 1960’s
Estimate: $80—120
 
Lot 61 BENT ERIKSEN DANISH STERLING SILVER NECKLACE AND CLIP EARRINGS
Estimate: $200—300

 

To view all the items in the September 30 - October 5 online auction visit: Silver & Costume Jewellery Auction.

 

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Posted: 9/22/2017 12:00:00 AM
By: Christa Lambert


Making Your Connection ...with Art


I watched the Emmys Sunday night. From start to finish. No fast forwarding. Stephen Colbert is reason enough to extract this level of commitment from me but I also experienced a revelation where I least expected it. From Donald Trump. Okay not THE Donald Trump but rather from Alec Baldwin, who won an Emmy for his SNL portrayal of the current president.

I’ll have to paraphrase slightly, but Baldwin’s acceptance speech resonated with me. He said when we are at the end of our life, we won’t remember a bill that was passed or a supreme court decision or an address made by the president. We remember a book, or a line from a favourite play, a painting, a scene from a movie or a song. Unlike Proust and his madeleine cookies, for me it is music, books, and pictures that provoke strong memories and deep emotion, so I agree with Mr. Trump...I mean Alec.

When I walked around our sale room today, I was reminded of this: How the art we choose to surround ourselves with enriches our lives throughout our lifetime. There are pictures hanging now that I will really miss when they leave Waddington’s for their new homes but I won’t soon forget them. I’ve made a connection. Art helps us connect with each other, too. With people from our own time and those that have gone before.

We want to encourage you to come down and make that connection, too, so we’ve extended our viewing hours for the Select Auction and will stay open for you to visit Tuesday, September 19 and Wednesday, September 20 until 7 p.m.

 

 

 

Posted: 9/19/2017 12:00:00 AM
By: Linda Rodeck


Don't Miss the Opportunity to Consign


Josephie Pootoogook, Joyfully I see Ten Caribou, 1959, Estimate: $6,000-9,000

Waddington’s invites you to consign to our Fall 2017 auctions of Important Inuit Art.

Here are a few of the reasons you should consider consigning to Waddington's:

1. Our service excellence combined with four decades of experience in selling Inuit Art at auction culminates in superior results for our valued clients.

2. Marketing is a key element of our success. Our strategic marketing channels include direct mail, digital marketing, social media and personal contact to reach our own extensive network of clients - and to reach new audiences.

3. When it comes time to preview the auction, our downtown Toronto location provides the perfect gallery space for your artwork to be presented in museum-quality exhibitions prior to the auction.

Please note that we are interested in major collections as well as individual works for our upcoming auctions.

If you would like to find out more about the many benefits of working with Waddington’s, please contact us.

Christa Ouimet co@waddingtons.ca 416.847.6184

 

Highlights from our Upcoming Auctions

 

Josephie Pootoogook, Woman Scraping Skin, 1958 Estimate: $3,000-5,000
Johnny Inukpuk, Woman Cradling Infant, 36" Estimate: $30,000-40,000
Josephie Pootoogook, Joyfully I See Ten Caribou, 1959 Estimate: $6,000-8,000
Osuitok Ipeelee, Hawk, 16.5" Estimate: $22,000-26,000 

 

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Posted: 9/15/2017 12:00:00 AM
By: Christa Ouimet


Halcyon Days


CHARLES FRASER COMFORT, BLUE DAY, GEORGIAN BAY, MONUMENT CHANNEL

2017 was the 100th anniversary of the tragic death of Tom Thomson.

This summer, I visited some of Thomson's favourite painting places and then paddled with my daughter to the cairn on Canoe Lake, a pilgrimage in honour of this exceptional Canadian. It was a poignant experience for me and a powerful reminder of the beauty of the Canadian landscape and the fleetingness of summer, which we can easily forget when we spend too much time behind a desk or tablet.

The one thing that keeps most of us sane during summer in the city is that great Canadian institution - the pilgrimage to cottage country beginning from the Victoria Day weekend and repeated religiously every weekend thereafter we can spare. The glory days of summer (despite a little rain here and there) begin to taper off now with the arrival of Labour Day Weekend. Our thoughts turn to the start of the school year, to TIFF, to gallery hops and galas and other city- centred events that fill the early months of autumn, muffling the cries of the loons and the splash of a paddle, putting distance between those lazy, hazy, crazy days of summer as we sprint towards Christmas.

There will be no more time for trips north now but, luckily for us, hanging in the office of the Canadian Art Department, is Charles Comfort's exquisite rendering of Monument Channel, Georgian Bay extending that summer idyll for a few weeks longer until it, too, moves on to the home of whoever is wise enough to acquire it at our November 20th auction of Important Canadian Art.

In saying goodbye to summer 2017, Anna, Rochelle and I want to take this opportunity to wish all of you a safe and enjoyable long weekend. We look forward to welcoming you back to our sales rooms on September 17 and 18th, when we will be previewing our Select Online Sale of Canadian Art.

Posted: 9/1/2017 12:00:00 AM
By: Linda Rodeck


Recent & Upcoming Events in Canadian Art


What's Happening in Canadian Art at Waddington's

Waddington’s May 29th Spring Auction of Important Canadian Art was an exhilarating evening with the total hammer price for the sale widely exceeded Waddington’s pre-sale expectation for this select 112 lot event.

Our cover lot, an early topographical watercolour by William Armstrong, came within a hair’s breadth of setting a new world record for the artist. Our back cover lot, a mighty 1961 McEwen painting, doubled its pre-sale estimate, and dozens of other lots soared well above their pre-sale estimate, to our sellers’ great delight.

On June 27th, we will be conducting our Canada 150 Auction which includes exquisite and fascinating objects and works of art selected to tell the story of Canada’s history. The sale is a collaborative event supported by the Canadian Art, Decorative Arts, Inuit Art, International Art and Jewellery Departments here at Waddington’s.

Please be sure to look for highlights from the Canadian Art Department including a suite of 21 paintings by William Kurelek depicting Huronia in 17th Century Canada, as well as works by AY Jackson, Frederick Banting, Emily Carr, Jane-Ash Poitras and others.

Details about this special sesquicentennial event can be found here: The Canada 150 Auction

 

Posted: 6/15/2017 12:00:00 AM
By: Linda Rodeck


Waddington’s Canada 150 Auction


The Canada 150 auction is a special Waddington's event celebrating Canada's 150th anniversary featuring art and objects of historical and cultural significance. Some may be whimsical, others more important, all drawn together to celebrate and tell the stories of 150 years of Canadian art and culture. Waddington's is proud to be Canada's oldest auction house, founded pre-Confederation. Our deep well of expertise crosses multiple collecting categories, showcasing our rich passion and capacity for scholarship and linking our heritage to Canada's. This specialized auction will share in the excitement of Canada’s sesquicentennial. Please contact Sean Quinn for further information: sq@waddingtons.ca View the Auction Gallery



CITY OF TORONTO QUEEN VICTORIA DIAMOND JUBILEE ENAMELLED GOLD MEDAL, 1897 Estimate: $2,000—3,000



PROVINCE OF CANADA LAND GRANT TO SIR SANFORD FLEMING, 1856 Estimate: $300—400



LARGE SILVER CANADIAN INDIAN PEACE MEDAL, 1860 Estimate: $2,000—3,000



AFTER JOHN S.C. SCHAAK (ACTIVE WESTMINSTER 1761-1769), BRITISH MAJOR GENERAL JAMES WOLFE, COMMANDER IN CHIEF OF HIS MAJESTY’S FORCES ON THE EXPEDITION AGAINST QUEBEC, 1759 Estimate: $3,000—5,000



JOHN MARSHALL & CO. ‘CANADIAN SPORTS’ LARGE BASIN, 1880S Estimate: $150—250


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Posted: 6/3/2017 12:00:00 AM
By: Tess McLean


SKAM Graffiti Art Online Auction April 3 - 13


Waddington’s is proud to present Toronto’s first auction of Graffiti Art. A collection of 16 recent works by Toronto-based artist Jason Wing, known as SKAM, will be offered in an online auction April 3 to 13. Highly-regarded, Jason is considered one of Toronto’s true, original graffiti artists.

Formally trained in graphic design at George Brown College, Jason began creating his art over 20 years ago, which now appears everywhere from dark back alleys to gleaming corporate spaces. Of the works featured in the Waddington’s auction, each is an original, spray-painted freehand onto canvas, varying in size from 48” x 48” to 48” x 96”.

In answer to what he is inspired by, Jason says: “It varies, sometimes I sketch beforehand and sometimes I don’t. Nowadays with over a 1000 plus pieces under my belt I generally free style. I get inspiration from anywhere and everywhere: fashion, art, music, etc.”

Jason skillfully balances maintaining his street credit with receiving mainstream recognition for his work. He has designed movie sets, conducted live painting engagements for festivals and special events, as well as created commissioned artwork for clients like Yabu Pushelberg, Google, Beanfield Metroconnect, and Louis Vuitton.

In addition to his graffiti work, Jason is also an entrepreneur, and has turned his lifelong passion into a storefront business, Homebase, which sells graffiti supplies, providing other artists with access to great products and to connect with him. Jason is also prolific. He paints personal pieces on a weekly basis, completing an average of 80 works a year.

Duncan McLean, president of Waddington’s, notes that “urban art plays a critical role in constructive societal discourse. It is free expression at its ultimate and underlines our innate need to chronicle our stories, struggles, history.” He adds: “Waddington’s has been the vanguard of promoting diverse forms of Canadian art, from our first sales of Group of Seven works in the 1960s, to creating new markets for Inuit art over the last four decades, and developing a secondary market for contemporary Canadian art through our Concrete Contemporary Art Auctions and Projects division.”





Posted: 3/2/2017 12:00:00 AM
By: Tess McLean


"Off the Wall" Art Auction - June 22-25, 2015


GERSHON ISKOWITZ (CANADIAN, 1921-1988)
UNTITLED (detail)
$1,200—1,500
As always, our "Off the Wall" art auction offered an eclectic assemblage of artwork from a variety of artists. Enter: Ronald William Bolt, Gershon Iskowitz, Roy Lichtenstein and Dorothy Knowles.

This season’s June sale featured a wide variety of Canadian and International artists on scales large and small. As the current market for collecting has shifted to a more modern taste, our monthly online auctions offer many works of abstraction that would benefit any contemporary art enthusias. Side by side with works of the classic tradition, including esteemed Canadian artists Frederick Stanley Haines and Paul Rodrik, bidding online has never been so fun… and rewarding.

Our "Off the Wall" art auctions continue to exceed our expectations here at Waddington’s. With art coming in all the time, fine art specialist Doug Payne, together with his remarkable eye for detail, selects and supplies the demand for abstraction and mixed media works that attract so many collectors. With this our monthly online auctions continue to appeal to a vast audience, with art that ranges in style, subject matter, palette and is easy on the wallet.

We hope you enjoyed the selection of artwork featured in our "Off the Wall" art auctions throughout the season.


View the Auction Gallery

View the PDF Catalogue

Posted: 6/15/2015 12:00:00 AM
By: Tess McLean


As one auction season ends, another is soon underway…


Upcoming Auction Highlights
2014 was extremely busy at Waddington’s with 21 live auctions, 43 online auctions, several selling exhibitions and numerous fundraising events. Across our various departments we brought together 4,219 successful bidders with over 12,000 lots consigned by 3,039 vendors. And our Canadian art department set 12 new artist’s auction records this year!

Our success in 2014 was in great part due to our diversity of knowledge and experience, and our broad market networks. Waddington’s is well equipped to handle your items not only through our traditional departments, but anything you can challenge us with no matter how unique.

For me, the stand-out items are not always the most valuable ones. In 2014, what I found the most intriguing was The Billy Jamieson Collection of everything macabre, magical and outrageous – including a wooden New Guinea cannibal fork, a 19th c human tooth necklace, a pair of Houdini’s handcuffs and a commemorative slice of Jumbo the Elephant’s tusk originally presented to Mrs. P.T. Barnum.

Other 2014 auction highlights were a 16th c gilt bronze Buddha, a stone sculpture by Inuit artist Davidialuk depicting the story of Katyutayuuq, a rare set of 12 Imperial Russian dinner plates, a 19th c Napoleonic chess set depicting the Battle of Algiers, Sir Isaac Brock's Knighthood Commission document, an Elizabethan (1580) silver-mounted Tigerware jug, an Andy Warhol portrait of Karen Kain, and an important J.E.H MacDonald oil sketch for a major AGO collection canvas.  Now how’s that for diversity!

Spring 2015 will see Waddington’s offer yet another unique collection to complement our traditional department offerings: 250 pieces from the ‘FXSMITH Studio Collection’ including movie costumes and props from films like The X Men series and The Curious Case of Benjamin Button. 

We invite you to be part of our Spring 2015 season and to consider a consignment opportunity with us. Whether live, online or through private sale, we can provide the best forum to buy or sell.

Winter 2015 Newsletter (PDF)

Spring 2015 Auction and Consignment Schedule (PDF)

— Duncan McLean
President

Posted: 1/26/2015 12:00:00 AM
By: Duncan McLean


IN MEMORY OF TOLLER CRANSTON


(1949 – 2015)

Toller Cranston lived in a grand Victorian home on Pembroke Street in downtown Toronto in the 1980s. Waddington’s was on Queen Street East at that time – on the other side of Moss Park, a short walk away. Toller was a regular at all our auctions, which in those days included twice-weekly estate auctions offering anything and everything to be found in a home. Toller was always on the hunt for the wild, the colourful, the outrageous, the beautiful and anything over the top. His favourite expression when he saw something he had to have was: “It’s beyond the beyond!” Pieces Toller had to have included an Italian Murano green glass indoor fountain that was destined for his bay window (where it actually worked once installed); a huge black metal sculpture of a flying raven; as well as every antique, carved wood cherub he could find.

One evening, I was hanging out with Toller and Bill Kime, another friend from Waddington’s, at his home. In our conversation Toller declared that it was time for him to start selling a few pieces to help spark a change in his life. This was during a difficult period for Toller, in the twilight of his skating career, and feeling unappreciated by the art world. (I remember a large canvas he had recently painted of classically Victorian dressed skaters on a frozen outdoor pond. On a hill next to the pond, a sinister-looking tree with another skater hanging by the neck from a branch over the frozen pond. That was Toller – dramatic and dark-humoured.)

Bill suggested that the best way to sell his pieces was not a few at a time, but all at once as a big event that would generate excitement; create a buzz in Toller’s world of art and entertainment. Toller loved the theatre of big events – and he was immediately excited by the prospect. In June 1991, after many days of working closely with Toller to catalogue the collection and produce a catalogue, Waddington’s offered the contents of his three-story house over a three-session auction. Invitations to the preview party were highly sought. Fans, collectors, voyeurs and media spilled out our front doors the evening of the first auction. And as predicted, the sale of his home and its contents allowed him to “reinvent himself”. Toller bought a magnificent estate in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico’s artist colony, where many ex-pat Canadians including Leonard Brooks and Toller’s good friend Gary Slipper were already settled. A new chapter of his life.

The reality is, Toller had already reinvented himself several times – from virtuoso world-champion skater, to caustic commentator to devoted coach – Toller had pushed the limits of a restrictive sport at every leap and turn. As a painter, Toller’s work was like his artistry on ice. Graceful, sensual, provocative, at times dark, or exploding with colour and energy. Defying tradition and eschewing conformity.

Toller lived large. He craved attention and appreciation, but he also spoke the truth as he saw it – which often landed him on the wrong side of the establishment. He had a wicked sense of humour and could slay his critics with a mere word or two. Toller was brilliant. He should be honoured as one of Canada’s most remarkable creative forces for changing the Canadian landscape in so many ways. Toller was a friend. He was generous, he was fun, he was both a social animal and a solitary man, a mercurial temperament who would disappear for months and then return with bravado.

Toller will be missed. By me, by those who had the chance to enter his magical life, and everyone else who will be touched by his creative legacy.

Duncan McLean
27/01/15


This photograph of Toller’s main floor living room was taken by Joy von Tiedemann and used as the auction catalogue cover. It’s a wonderfully mad room that is all Toller.





These images of Toller and his home were simply taken down off his wall to be used in the auction catalogue.





These images are of the auction preview displaying Toller’s immense and diverse collection. Waddington’s gallery had never looked so vibrant, so colourful or so fantastic!



Posted: 1/26/2015 12:00:00 AM
By: Duncan McLean


Specialists' Preview - Spring 2014 Auction Highlights
April 3 – 8, 2014


Sometimes what’s old is truly new again. Traditionally, Waddington’s held our much anticipated Fine Art Auctions bi-annually, a dedicated week of previewing and selling the best we had to offer for that season from all our departments. Previewed as an enormous mix of wonderful and eclectic, rare and beautiful, classically traditional and wildly eccentric, there was something for everyone and for every taste. As all our departments grew, it became unwieldy to organize all our auctions and previews into the same time period. Spreading the auctions throughout the spring was more manageable, and the departments began to conduct business more autonomously, focused on their core proven markets and clients.

Fast forward ten years and we see an evolution in market tastes and buying trends. Today, fewer people collect as a hobby in pursuit of objects from a narrow, focused area of interest. Nowadays people are more likely to collect to decorate their home or business – and they’re much more willing to mix cultures, textures and periods to create an individualized environment. In reflection, our traditional preview settings more suited to the current more diversified market. They made it easy to imagine how things would look in situ – how an English highland painting might look beside the Sorel Etrog sculpture already in your home, how the clean and powerful lines of an Inuit sculpture could complement your Group of Seven canvas. How a delicate Chinese vase is flattered by art deco bronze figures and English silver candle sticks. It was almost like looking at the pages of a décor magazine.

So we’re borrowing from the past. We’re bringing back the multi-department preview to demonstrate how great but different art can blend together. Our specialists (some of the best in the world in their various categories of expertise) have handpicked their favourite items from their spring season auctions. The most interesting, most eclectic, and in some cases the most valuable, to be previewed together in our gallery in one glorious display. And to further enhance the experience, we’ve also invited Farrow & Ball to be part of the display, weaving in the colour palette and wallpaper highlights from their spring season.

We look forward to sharing some of our favourite things with you.

Please be sure to visit April 3 – 8.

Posted: 3/31/2014 12:00:00 AM
By: Duncan McLean


"Off the Wall" Art Blog


Hello 2014!

Entering into our 15th year of Monthly Art Auctions - both Off The Wall and Online - I would like to thank all those who participated in making 2013 a successful and fun year. I am looking forward to another year of offering the wide range of artworks, sculptures, etc. that come through our doors.

The January 20 - 23rd online auction has some great works coming up and many more affordable pieces. Here are just a few names that will be offered:

Norval Morrisseau
Robert Pilot
W. Goodridge Roberts
Tom Roberts
Harry Britton
Blake Debassige
Arthur Verner
J.W. Beatty
A.A. Edson
B. des Clayes
H.S. Palmer
Guido Odierna
J. Giunt
Henry Cooper
Alfred Leyman, and much more.
Posted: 1/15/2014 12:00:00 AM
By: Doug Payne


Off the Wall - May 2013


Hello and welcome to my second blog posting!

First, I would like to thank all those who participated in March's past auction, and for making the monthly "Off The Wall" online auction a success. I truly can't believe it is almost April already!

Each month offers a variety of mixed works - from The Good, The Bad and The Ugly. However, beauty is in the eye of the buyer. Nothing surprises me anymore! After working at Waddingtons.ca for 27 years and having probably seen over a million pieces of art, you'd think I might have seen it all. But sometimes, out of the blue, something will come in that will fill me with wonder and leave me saying "Wow, amazing!" (which is truly difficult to do .. ha ha).

For some of the auctions, you are probably in the same boat as me when I see how much works are sold for, given the conservative estimates I offer. This probably explains why 98% of the works offered each month are sold. My working motto is "I'm here to sell it, not showcase it". It's amazing and it works. The Off the Wall web page is one of the busiest in the company.

In April, "Off The Wall" has another great online auction from the 22nd to 25th. Works include pieces by Marion Long (2), Andre Bieler (5), Andre Lapine, Allen Sapp, Marmaduke Matthews, William Armstrong, Willem Hendriks, Guido Odierna, Wentworth Folkins, Bobs Cogill Haworth, Alexander Dzigurski, Bertram Brooker, Guy Michon (3), Horatio Walker, Leif Ostlund (6), Carl Beam, G. Osborn, Dick Ferrier, Geza Marich, Edmond Montague Morris, Farquhar McGillivray Knowles, Tom Scott, Antoine Blanchard, Nihan Basak (3), Albert J. Franck (4), Frederick S. Haines, Nicholas Hornyansky, Ted Bertram, L.A.C. Panton, Ernest A. Dalton, William John Hopkinson (2), and many more. Each piece is a high quality of work, with new pieces being consigned every day, so stay tuned for more to come!

Each day seems busier than the last with clients coming in to meet with me for various reasons. Whether they are downsizing their homes, inherited beautiful pieces or selling works they've had for years (or some just recently found), I am rarely at my desk! That said, if I don't answer my phone when you ring, please call the main line at (416) 504 - 9100, or drop me an email at dp@waddingtons.ca and I will be more than happy to assist you in any way possible.

For those of you wishing to consign for the April "Off The Wall" online auction, the deadline is April 10th by 5 pm. Finally, make sure to put the May dates into your calendar as the online auction will be running from May 13th - 16th, with consignments being accepted until May 1st.

Thanks for stopping by. I am looking forward to the myriad of online auctions coming up this Spring and can't wait to see what the Summer has in store (if it ever gets here!)

All the best,

Doug Payne (or as Ronald McLean used to call me... Bluto)
Posted: 5/1/2013 12:00:00 AM
By: Doug Payne


Off the Wall - October 2012


Hello and welcome to my first Blog....ever. I'm been working here at Waddingtons since February 1986. I can honestly tell you that I love it and love what I do. My experience comes from "hands on" and having a photographic memory surely helps.

Since we started "Off the Wall" auctions way back in February 1998 (I can still remember the very first lot, an etching of "Ward's Island". We are now approaching the 14th year of these auctions and an estimated 40,000 pictures later, we are still going strong.

The "Off the Wall" auctions offer a variety of artworks from well known artists to the unknown. It's a great way for clients who are just starting an art collection or wishing to add to their collections or those dealers/sellers looking for a quick turnaround at affordable prices.

In the upcoming "Off the Wall" November 12th - 15th, will include works by Manly MacDonald, Rene Richards, Henry George Glyde, Betty Goodwin, John Joy, and many other noted artists, as well as lesser known and decorative works.
Posted: 10/1/2012 12:00:00 AM
By: Doug Payne

UPCOMING AUCTIONS & EVENTS



"Off the Wall" Art Online Auction
July 7 - 12, 2018


Sunday, July 8
from 12:00 pm to 4:00 pm
Monday, July 9
from 1:00 pm to 7:00 pm